Write Great Fiction - Description & Setting


If ever you have had an issue with this law of writing, understanding the difference, knowing when to use one or the other - yes, you will want to use both or anything in between, this is the chapter for you. With plenty of examples of not just how and when to use 'show' but how and when using 'tell' can be appropriate, this chapter was one of the chapters that made this purchase worth it.

The other chapter that made it all worth while and my third favorite how nice, to have them all in one little clump like that! That means using all five of the senses to set up a scene, mood, environment, whatever! It's easy to say this table is old and worn, the edges faded and chipped.

It is much more difficult to describe that same table or even the room the table is in by utilizing the other senses. This chapter will help clear up some of the confusion and point you in the right direction. Another chapter that's going to get a permanent bookmark in it, this chapter is entirely devoted to describing your characters.

Not just physically, but mentally, emotionally, what their needs and wants are. How you can use other characters, setting, and the knowledge you have about the character to give readers information without putting together a list. Rozelle also makes specific mention to the chapter prior, sensory description, and how you can use that to your advantage here. This referencing to other chapters or pages is done often and as a friendly, unassuming 'reminder'.

Here we get a look at 'Time and Place' and how to use both to fully develop your world. Macrocosm and microcosms are both discussed as well as remembering things like weather and geography and how both will not only establish your setting but will undoubtedly affect your character in one way or another.

Writing Setting Using Specific Details: How-to Creative Writing Tip

This is the chapter that looks at description and setting in the various genres, how they differ and how you can use them to help construct a better story. Using your setting and description to help move your story along. How you can use it to establish mood and tone by your characters actions but also how you can use description and setting to help illuminate some of the conflicts in your novel. The example used for this one is an excerpt from Edith Wharton's Ethan Frome. And while I had hoped to never read a line from that book again after high school, I can't deny that the excerpt chosen illustrates the point at hand exceedingly well.

Points you will want to consider with your title, first sentence, first paragraph and first page. Also, how to use tidbits from reality without simply copying and pasting. How to recognize when you're using too much or too little and how to deal with 'clutter'.

Didacticism, not so sure! Finally, putting it all together. Finding a time that's set aside just for you to write, using little reminders and notes on your settings, as well as a few notes on the revision process. I hope being able to see exactly what each chapter tackles will help you make an educated decision on whether or not this book is for you.

One of the aspects that sold me, was that it isn't just a manual on how to describe a gorgeous sunset or a dusty, old library, it discusses and in some cases itemizes all of the tools, devices, do's and don'ts you will need to use, remember and pull out of your bag of tricks in order to craft a successful novel. And not successful in a monetary or publicity sense, successful in that it does what it is meant to do, tell a story. I learned a lot but a book has to hold your attention in order to inform you.

It was easy to get distracted from this one. Mar 02, Natasha Oliver rated it it was amazing Shelves: This one fortunately for you and me, is not.

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Editorial Reviews. About the Author. Ron Rozelle is the author of three books and teaches Write Great Fiction - Description & Setting by [Rozelle, Ron]. Write Great Fiction - Description & Setting by Ron Rozelle (Mar 15 ) on bosol.com *FREE* shipping on qualifying offers.

If you're serious about becoming a writer and you've already begun the journey, then this is one for the collection. Specifically it gives you examples of how to: Show vs Tell a common problem with most new authors 2. Description description for literature vs description for popular fiction 3. Grammar a very brief section that you'll probably already know if you've been writing for some time now There is other useful info as well, but these are just a few. Lastly, unlike most authors in this genre, he does not solely reference his own books.

He uses a wide range of writers encompassing literature as well as popular modern fiction. Mar 06, Brooke Johnson rated it liked it. This book was a slog to get through, and apparently I've already read it once before, but it was so forgettable, I didn't remember ever reading it. I feel like I got a bit more out of it this time than my previous read of it four years ago, but it was still boring as heck to read. My mind kept wandering, and I'd have to reread paragraphs to make sure I didn't skim over something.

There were some good nuggets buried in here, things that I sort of "knew" but never actually realized in a craft sens This book was a slog to get through, and apparently I've already read it once before, but it was so forgettable, I didn't remember ever reading it. There were some good nuggets buried in here, things that I sort of "knew" but never actually realized in a craft sense, things that old trunked novels were missing that I couldn't figure out at the time, and things that I could use in my current WIP.

For what few things I highlighted, it was worth the reread, but the overall book was a chore to finish. I have both this version and also the older Elements of Fiction writing book on 'Setting' by Bickham. Both were excellent, but I found the older version to be slightly more helpful in fleshing out the setting-as-a-character in my epic fantasy work. This is the newer of the two and it relies more on internet-research.

When it comes to setting, there is nothing like being there and speaking to people who have been there to get a 'feel' for a place, I have discovered. But once again, both books wer I have both this version and also the older Elements of Fiction writing book on 'Setting' by Bickham. But once again, both books were excellent. For me, I preferred the older version. Dec 05, Amanda Patterson rated it really liked it. All of the titles in this series are worth buying if you want to get published.

You have to learn the techniques of what makes a novelist succeed in the 21st century - or carry on writing tomes for yourself. Mar 29, Tizzy rated it really liked it Shelves: Description has been a bit of a weak spot for me. This has been pointed out by my editor and, at times, by the odd reader so I was aware I needed help. Not that the book never misses the mark. The thing here is, this is a general guide on description and setting.

The chapter where it attempts to help with description on specialized fiction might as well not be in the book, for it becomes so general and at times detached from the actual genres it might as well not be there. For me, it was very useful — but I was looking for ways to make my writing richer, and trying to learn how to more naturally insert description into my writing.

However, if your issue is not being sure on how to write a specific genre, skip this one. Whatever specialized information it has is too vague to be at all useful. Dec 31, Todd Hogan rated it liked it. Books that offer writing help are like Road Maps: Their value and usefulness depends upon where you are.

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Since I had questions about how to effectively create a sense of place, this book had some great ideas. But it goes further, giving hints on character descriptions and using all the tools in a writer's toolbox. More info than I needed. Ron Rozelle does a good job of presenting the information, with some telling examples, and a fine appendix that reprises what was said earlier in the book. He Books that offer writing help are like Road Maps: He wanted the reader to have no excuse for not understanding what he was communicating.

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He does a fine job. So, this is a fine book that covers many of the fundamentals, although there are other books that cover them more completely and with more enthusiasm. Jan 12, Monica Rodriguez rated it liked it Shelves: This book covers the main points and strategies for writing description and setting, but it didn't have a lot in the way of technique. He used a lot of examples, and sometimes would simply say, there. Read more like that. I also didn't find the exercises very useful.

They were rather involved, and would have been more useful if I hadn't been in the midst of editing my work in progress. Another thing that made me frequently start skimming was that the author was wordy and long-winded. He took par This book covers the main points and strategies for writing description and setting, but it didn't have a lot in the way of technique. He took paragraphs to get to the point at times, and often interjected with irrelevant asides.

I think he was trying to establish a conversational tone, but it just seemed to get in the way. So, my final opinion is meh. You can find a better book to help you with your writing. Feb 06, Philip Dampier rated it really liked it. One of the better craft books I've read and like the others in the Write Great Fiction series has lots of helpful information. I particularly enjoyed all the references to wordsmithing. Being a wordsmith is the ambition of all writers I think.

If you are into writing I recommend this book. Sep 05, NePo rated it really liked it. Book has a lot of practical advice, however it's missing wow factor. Aug 08, T Ramon rated it it was amazing. Easy and informative read. Dec 27, Patricia Caviglia rated it it was amazing. The more I can learn about writing the better. This book is easy to follow and understand. It will definitely improve anyone's writing.

Aug 07, Katrin Gertsen rated it it was amazing. The book is great! Jan 22, Liza rated it liked it. I think it takes a lot of hubris to say you don't need to improve your craft; I worry what it says about me when I have to admit a book on writing didn't work for me. Becoming a better writer is important to me, but there comes a point in time where I had to admit the advice didn't work for me or it wasn't clear or some other factor prevented me to get the full lessons I was seeking.

There were parts of this book where I found the advice to be so useful I wanted to figure out a way to integrate i I think it takes a lot of hubris to say you don't need to improve your craft; I worry what it says about me when I have to admit a book on writing didn't work for me. There were parts of this book where I found the advice to be so useful I wanted to figure out a way to integrate it into my current writing such as the chapter called, "Using all the Tools In Your Kit.

Learning to Pay Attention The book took a wrong turn for me, when I read chapter four and five. By the end of chapter four I'm wondering when to "show" and when to "tell" so to read at the end this process is mostly instinctive, I became annoyed. I felt that could have been said earlier. I also think "showing" and "telling" in some instances wasn't made clear. I wanted to be able to recognize when I was simply telling. Usually the "telling" example was one sentence in length, but I've seen long paragraph that simply "tell" and after seeing it so frequently in YA, I think part of the reason is that its harder to recognize it in your own writing.

I think I would have preferred to see more on that. When talking about sensory description, I found to my dismay that the reason description and writing about description is so hard to teach is because it's dependent on the examples used. Many of the prime examples Rozelle used, I glazed over or couldn't connect with. There were at least one excerpt from a novel I could never continue past chapter one, so I found sections of it to be absolutely boring. I asked one of my twitter friends her thoughts and she responded back simply with, "Description is sometimes very boring to read and write.

The book was hit or miss depending on the chapter.

Write Great Fiction: Description & Setting | bosol.com

Where "Working the Magic" simply didn't work for me I felt other chapters were packed with information that was useful to me and I could extract from and use from this day forward. I think had I not struggled getting past chapter four and five I would have considered this a must read for writers wanting to learn more about improving their description.

I felt the concepts of "sensory description" and "showing and telling" are vital to the writing process, so for me to feel those were the weakest chapters made this a difficult book to read. There was a lot of positive tips that I felt were beneficial to me. I'm just disappointed that some of the chapters I was most interested in reading, became the least useful to me.

Worth reading for the exercises at the end of each chapter, as well as the info provided. Nov 17, Ashley rated it it was amazing. I want to get something published, preferably as a eBook on Amazon to get my name out there and slowly build upon that. That's the plan anyway. Although I've written for a number of years, I'm still very much a novice. I still grapple with grammar issues, perspective, etc. This book is a very useful resource for beginning writers. The author, Ron Rozelle, explains weighty concepts without dumbing it down. Never once did I feel like Ronzelle was talking down to me.

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Didacticism, not so sure! You'll love this three-part series. Goodreads helps you keep track of books you want to read. If ever you have had an issue with this law of writing, understanding the difference, knowing when to use one or the other - yes, you will want to use both or anything in between, this is the chapter for you. To learn more about Amazon Sponsored Products, click here.

He uses examples from well known authors to emphasize key points. After reading this, I feel like I understand a little better this craft that is writing. I've even started to incorporate some of the things from the book into my writing. Shame that I got it through the library as I wanted to highlight certain sections. Liked it so much I bought it on Amazon. Jun 10, Justin rated it really liked it Shelves: Description and Setting tackles the two elements which give life to the whole picture of a story.

This two hundred and eight page tome might easily have been whittled down to one hundred and twenty five pages or thereabouts if the editor had been a wise one. Secondly, Rozelle has the bad habit of referring mostly to literary fiction as opposed to balancing the book between that and commercial fiction. In fact, many of the books he alludes to were written decades ago and, in today's market, while they may have been solid examples of how to write THEN, they are not always good examples for today.

Thirdly, the various exercises at the end of each chapter also vary in quality and usefulness. Some of them are excellent, some of them so ridiculous that I can only assume, as with much of the book, a word or page count was required by the publishers. This is one of those times where less would actually have been more. Despite all of this, there is ONE chapter that is packed with useful information and which moves along amazingly well - Chapter Four: Showing, Telling and Combining the Two.

Had Rozelle written the entire book in this way, it would be a thrill to read and make use of. I could easily assume someone other than Rozelle had written this chapter because it is so different from the rest of the book. I can usually get through a book like this in a day or two - two weeks after trying to give this a read, I am still only halfway through it and most likely will not finish it. BUT, it was worth the time to read chapter four as it has been of great use, and on that score I think the book is worth owning if only by virtue of buying it used.

Kindle Edition Verified Purchase. I have read a few books on writing. Most of them seem to a tribute to the author who you never heard of, but this book focuses an one area and does it oh so well. By showing examples and techniques to construct your writing by deconstructing great writing, she walks you through the writing process. Even though I'm a beginner in fiction writing, I only learned a few things from this book.

Chapter 2 which advises on how to be pay attention contains a full-page account of the author's trip to Ellis island [page 20] -- I skipped it after reading the first sentence. Also, the usefulness of the suggested free-writing exercises "focus on the past" and "focus on the present" is questionable. It covers literary devices such as personification, symbolism, allusions, analogies, similes, and metaphors, including adverbs, adjectives, and punctuation. Chapter 8 comprises commentaries on setting and description as they relate to historical fiction, mystery, science fiction, Westerns, romance and horror.

They are too superficial to be of practical use. The author does not give any tip for conjuring a good title but merely cites a list of novels as examples of "good" titles. A Google search trawls out better material on this topic. A few of the author's suggestions are mundane; others should be treated with caution such as advocating the use of adverbs and adjectives.

For instance, on page , he states: Aren't most writing faults spotted by re-reading? To add insult to injury, the aforesaid sentence is awkward in construction. There are some solid tips and helpful exercises in this book designed to help you write readable descriptions and settings. I think, however, like any book on writing, you get out as much as you put in.

  1. Me and Tennessee.
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In other words, you've got to practice as you read. I did find a lot of the helpful hints repetitive in that I've read them in other books , but I guess good advice gets repeated. So, if you're new to writing and books on writing, I suppose this would be as good a place to start as any! I love this book, if you are a writer this is a good book. I buy several books for writers to help me along the way. It will help you with description and your settings and what to look for. See all 77 reviews.

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Write Great Fiction: Description & Setting

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